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Guitars

View our complete collection line of guitar and amp accessories.
1954 Fender Stratocaster Limited Edition #1
$3,950.
1960’s Silvertone “Estrelita” 6 String Hollow Body Guitar
$1,250.
1997 Gibson “Jimmy Page Les Paul 1st Edition” Guitar
$4,900.

Amps

View our vintage accessories from the 50’s through the 70’s.
1962 Fender Bandmaster Piggy Back Amp
$2,200.
1984 MESA Boogie 4X12 Speakers
$800.
1971 Sound City 50 Plus Amp
$1,475.

Vintage Amps

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Accessories

View our complete collection line of guitar and amp accessories.
1984 Electro-Harmonix Cock Fight Foot Pedal
$90.
Yamaha P-105 Stage Digital Piano 88 Keys
$500.
DigiTech Trio Band Creator
$100.

Clapton – Boston, Mass – 1974

Guitars Are Back, Baby!

Painted by some as a boomer relic just years ago, the guitar is seeing a revival that may just extend past the stress-purchase quarantine bounce.

Not so long ago, things didn’t look so great for the guitar, that global symbol of youthful freedom and rebellion for 70 years running.

With hip-hop and Beyoncé-style spectacle pop supposedly owning the hearts and wallets of millennials and Generation Z — and so many 20th-century guitar deities either dead (Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain) or soloing into their 70s (Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page) — electric guitar sales had skidded by about one-third in the decade since 2007, according to Music Trades, a research organization that tracks industry data.

Gibson guitars, whose celebrated Les Paul line had helped put the Led in Zeppelin, was sliding toward bankruptcy.

All of this was enough for The Washington Post to declare the “slow, secret death of the six-string electric” in 2017. That same year, even Mr. Clapton himself, known simply as “God” to devotees more than half a century ago, sounded ready to spread the ashes. “Maybe,” he mused at a 2017 news conference for the documentary “Eric Clapton: A Life in 12 Bars,” “the guitar is over.”

Full NY Times Article by Alex Williams